The Tom Woods Show

Whether it's "monopoly," child labor, the Depression of 1920-21, the New Deal, or World War II's impact on the economy, our views and interpretations run counter to the conventional wisdom. Here's a defense of our position. I delivered these remarks at the 2017 Mises University program.

Show notes for Ep. 964

Direct download: woods_2017_07_31.mp3
Category:Talk Radio -- posted at: 4:19pm EST

Lucas Engelhardt, associate professor of economics at Kent State University, joins me to discuss bad ways to reform the monetary system, as well as good ones. (Bad ones include the Taylor rule, inflation targeting, NGDP targeting, and Milton Friedman's approach.)

Show notes for Ep. 963

Direct download: woods_2017_07_30.mp3
Category:Talk Radio -- posted at: 3:15pm EST

The Austrian School of economics, the school of thought that includes Ludwig von Mises, F.A. Hayek, and Murray Rothbard -- and which influenced Ron Paul, of course -- is the subject of the Mises Institute's week-long Mises University summer program, which I'm attending right now. In the course of taking notes on my computer to help my 14-year-old daughter understand the concepts better, I realized there were some foundational parts of Austrian economics that some listeners may enjoy hearing clarified.
 
So in this episode I actually show how we can derive economic laws from the apparently sterile axiom that "human beings act." I also discuss where prices come from, and what the fundamental problem with socialism is.
 
Direct download: woods_2017_07_27.mp3
Category:Talk Radio -- posted at: 6:25pm EST

This episode is drawn from the Society and the State podcast, on which I was the guest for the very first episode. We discuss how I went from teaching a handful of college students to reaching many, many more via my online work -- and supported a family to boot. We also discuss a horrendous business failure of mine, and other fun things.

Show notes for Ep. 961

Direct download: woods_2017_07_26.mp3
Category:Talk Radio -- posted at: 3:59pm EST

Today I'm sharing what's normally a members-only Q&A I did with Bob Murphy at LibertyClassroom.com. It's a smorgasbord of Austrian economics, economic theory, and history -- with all the fun and banter you've come to love with Bob and me. Enjoy!

Show notes for Ep. 960

Direct download: woods_2017_07_25.mp3
Category:Talk Radio -- posted at: 4:51pm EST

One of my most significant intellectual influences was the extraordinarily productive polymath Murray N. Rothbard. In this kickoff talk at Mises University 2017, I discuss what he taught me, what it was like to meet and interact with him, why he's worthy of study, admiration, and respect, and why it's impossible in the world of ideas not to have enemies.

Show notes for Ep. 959

Direct download: woods_2017_07_24.mp3
Category:Talk Radio -- posted at: 3:16pm EST

David Weigel, national political correspondent for the Washington Post, released a book this year on the history of progressive rock -- which is a glorious and wonderful excuse for a podcast-length discussion of the subject. What's great about this kind of music, what happened to it, the best places to start, and a lot more.

Show notes for Ep. 958

Direct download: woods_2017_07_23.mp3
Category:Talk Radio -- posted at: 9:29pm EST

A great many libertarians have read at least some of Frederic Bastiat's work, but it's usually one or two of the same writings. Bastiat's output was vastly greater than what most of us are familiar with, and his life was extraordinarily eventful and exciting. David Hart, an expert on Bastiat, joins us for another look at a most underrated thinker and man.

Show notes for Ep. 957

Direct download: woods_2017_07_22.mp3
Category:Talk Radio -- posted at: 4:13pm EST

I asked David Gordon, possibly the most well-read person I've ever met, what books he thought libertarians should read. The result was this engaging discussion!

Show notes for Ep. 956

Direct download: woods_2017_07_21.mp3
Category:Talk Radio -- posted at: 3:43pm EST

Today's episode reaches back into history to the overlooked example of Genoa, where we discover the late medieval origins of entrepreneurial skills and institutions that formed the springboard for early modern economic development. The forgotten republican tradition of Genoa, moreover, poses an interesting alternative to the militarist and statist views of Machiavelli.

Show notes for Ep. 955

Direct download: woods_2017_07_20.mp3
Category:Talk Radio -- posted at: 5:09pm EST